2016 Game: FIRST Stronghold

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2016 Game: FIRST Stronghold

Robot Name: Robinhood

Field

The playing field is divided into red and blue alliance sections, separated by a neutral zone that contains boulders. Each section contains a courtyard, an area for opposing teams to shoot boulders at the castle goals, a “secret passage” that allows human players to feed boulders to their robots from the human player station, the “outer works”, and the tower.

Outer works

The outer works is the series of five defensive obstacles that divide the neutral zone from the alliance sections and span the field. Four of the five used obstacles are modular and can be moved, and certain obstacles may or may not be present during a match. Options for defensive obstacles include a cheval de frise, a “moat”, ramparts, a drawbridge, a sally port, a portcullis, a rock wall, and “rough terrain”. The defensive obstacle on the left of each outer works, the “low bar”, is not movable. LED light strips at the base of each obstacle display current obstacle strength.

Three defensive obstacles of the outer works in a particular match are determined by the teams playing the match and one obstacle is chosen by the audience.

There are over 18,000 possible field configurations from the eight defensive options.

After problems with robots and boulders getting stuck in the fabric on the low bar, FIRST made the decision to have it replaced with rubber flaps at some events (including the Championship).

Tower

The tower consists of five scoring goals, three scaling rungs, and a “batter”. Three high goals are 7 feet 1 inch above the playing field, and two low goals are six inches above the playing field. Three rungs for robots to scale the tower are 6 feet 4 inches from the playing field. Colored LED light strips on the front of the tower display the current tower strength. The “batter” is a series of seven 60° ramps at the base of the tower directly in front of the low goals designed to make challenging and scaling the tower difficult. The tower has a health of 8 for regional and district play and a health of 10 at the FIRST Championship.

Boulders

Scoring elements are called boulders, grey foam balls that are 10 inches in diameter. There are 12 boulders present on the field at the beginning of a match and 18 total. Six boulders are staged evenly along the mid line of the field, and three boulders are at each human player station and one in each robot.

Game play and scoring

Stronghold is a medieval tower defense game in which two alliances of up to three teams each compete to score points by breaching the opponent’s outer works and capturing the opponent’s tower. Before the match, teams and the audience select defenses to fortify the alliance’s outer works. Teams receive two ranking points in the competition standings for a win, and one ranking point for a tie.

Each match begins with a 15-second autonomous period where robots act on pre-programmed instructions. The match then transitions to a 2 minute and 15 second teleoperated (tele-op) period, where robots are driven by the drive teams.

Autonomous (auto) period

Robots begin in the neutral zone with the ability to hold one boulder each. However, alliances may assign a “spy” robot to start in the opposing alliance’s courtyard. Alliances earn 2 points for reaching the opposing alliance’s outer works, and earn 10 points for crossing them. Any additional defenses a robot crosses in auto will not decrease a defense’s strength, or give points to the alliance. Once across a defense, a robot in autonomous mode can score a high goal for 10 points or low goal for 5 points.

Tele-operated (tele-op) period

Robots retrieve boulders from either their secret passage or the mid line, overcome opponent defenses, and score goals in their opponent’s courtyard. Robots may transport only one boulder at a time. Each time a robot crosses an undamaged defense, they receive 5 points. Robots earn 5 points for scoring a high goal, and 2 points for a low goal. In the last 20 seconds of the match, robots race to the opposing alliance’s tower to either park on the batter, earning them 5 points for a challenge, or hang from the tower’s rungs, earning them 15 points for a scale.

Special scoring

A robot getting ready to shoot a boulder into the high goal

There are opportunities to score additional points by completing certain tasks in FIRST Stronghold. This can be done through breaching and or capturing, and will award the alliance either ranking points in the qualification matches or regular points in the playoff matches.

Breach

Any time a robot successfully crosses one of the opponent’s defenses (whether in autonomous or tele-op), that defense’s strength is reduced by 1/2. The second time a robot crosses the defense, that defense’s strength is reduced completely and is considered “damaged”. Once four of the five defenses are damaged, the outer works are considered breached. A breach is awarded 1 ranking point in qualifications and 20 points in playoffs.

Capture

As goals are scored in the opposing alliance’s tower, the tower’s strength will be lowered. After 8 goals (high or low), or 10 goals at the World Championships, the tower has no strength and is considered “weakened”. Only a weakened tower can be captured. To capture a tower, all robots in the alliance must either drive onto the opposing team’s batter, or scale the tower. Once the capture has been declared, the tower will turn to the capturing alliance’s color, and their flag will be raised. For capturing, the alliance receives 1 ranking point in qualifications, and 25 points in the playoffs.

2015 Game: Recycle Rush

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2015 Game: Recycle Rush

Robot Name: Relicycle

Game Overview

RECYCLE RUSH is a recycling-themed game designed for the 2015 FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC). It is played by two Alliances of three Teams each. Alliances compete simultaneously to score points by stacking Totes on Scoring Platforms, capping those stacks with Recycling Containers, and properly disposing of Litter, represented by pool noodles, in designated locations. In keeping with the recycling theme of the game, all scoring elements used are reusable or recyclable by teams in their home locations or by FIRST at the end of the season.

Field

The 27 ft. by 54 ft. playing Field is bisected by a small Step which may not be climbed on or crossed by Robots. Thus each Alliance competes on their respective 26 ft. by 27 ft. side of the Field.

Match

Each RECYCLE RUSH Match begins with a 15-second Autonomous Period in which Robots operate independently of their drivers. During this period, Robots attempt to move themselves, their Yellow Totes, and their Recycling Containers into the area between the scoring platforms, called the Auto Zone. Additional points are awarded if the Yellow Totes are arranged in a single stack.

During the remaining 2 minutes and 15 seconds of the Match, called the Teleop Period, Robots are controlled remotely by student drivers located behind the walls at the ends of the Field. Teams on an Alliance work together to place as many Totes on their Scoring Platforms as possible. Alliances earn additional points for Recycling Containers placed on the scored Totes, with Recycling Containers at greater heights earning more points. Alliances also earn points for disposing of their Litter in either their Landfill Zone (the area next to the Step marked by the white line) or placing Litter in or on scored Recycling Containers. Alliances that leave unscored Litter marked in the other Alliance’s color on their side of the Field at the end of the match add points to the score of the other Alliance, as it is considered unprocessed and not properly disposed.

Alliances have an opportunity to earn “Coopertition Points” by coordinating with the other Alliance in the Match. Coopertition Points are awarded if, at some point in the Match, there are at least four Yellow Totes on the Step simultaneously. Coopertition Points are doubled if the Alliances arrange at least four of those Yellow Totes in a single stack on the Step. Points for the Match are awarded based on the state of the scored objects at the end of the Match (with the exception of Coopertition Points, which can be earned at any point during the Match).

2014 Game: Aerial Assist

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2014 Game: Aerial Assist

Robot Name: Jiminy-Flik-It

Match Periods

In Aerial Assist, each match is 2 minutes and 30 seconds long, and consists of 2 periods.

  • Autonomous – first 10 seconds. Code on the robots is remotely activated, and robots may react to sensor inputs and commands programmed into the robot’s onboard control system. The robot tries to score a ball into a high or low goal and move forward into it’s colored alliance zone.
  • Teleoperated – 2 min, 20 sec, starting after the Autonomous Period. Humans remotely control their robots to try to earn points by scoring the ball in a goal (high or low), shoot it and catching it over the truss, and passing the ball to their alliance teamates down the field. To score passing points a robot must pass the ball to another robot in a different colored zone or take the ball into a different colored zone to their partner and pass it to them there (In other words, robots cannot pass the ball in only one colored part of the field; it has to move to different parts).

Field

The FIELD for AERIAL ASSIST is a 24 ft. 8 in. x 54 ft. carpeted area, bounded by and including the GUARDRAILS, ALLIANCE WALLS, and rear faces of the LOW GOALS. The FIELD floor is covered with carpet. Two HIGH GOALS are located at each end of the FIELD above the ALLIANCE WALLS. Two LOW GOALS are located in the corners next to each ALLIANCE WALL. A TRUSS bisects and spans the width of the FIELD. There is retro-reflective tape areas on both of the high goals. In Auton, teams can use cameras on their robots to detect when one of these is lit up (called: “hot”). It will stay lit/”hot” for 5 seconds (which one is lit being determined randomly).

Scoring

The following is how points are scored during the autonomous period.

Ball in low goal 6 Points 11 Points if “hot”
Ball in high goal 4 Points 20 Points if “hot”
Robot moves to alliance zone 6 Points

The following is how points are scored during teleoperated mode.

Ball in low goal 1 Point with 1 assist 11 Points with 2 assists 31 Points with 3 assists
Ball in high goal 10 Points with 1 assist 20 Points with 2 assists 40 Points with 3 assists
Ball over the truss 10 Points
Catch ball from over the truss 10 Points

2013 Game: Ultimate Ascent

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2013 Game: Ultimate Ascent

Robot Name: Flying Saunders

Field

Ultimate Ascent is played on a 27′ x 54′ field. There are two pyramids placed in the center of each half of the field. There are five scoring locations located on the opposite end of the field from the alliance station where that teams drivers are. Four of the goals are located on the opposing alliance’s wall. The fifth is part of the pyramid at that end of the field.

Matches

Ultimate Ascent matches are two minutes and fifteen seconds long. The first fifteen seconds are called the autonomous period. During this period the robots follow a set of pre-programmed instructions. Following this period the teams take control for the teleoperated period. Drivers control their robots, attempting to score discs into the goals at the opposite end of the playing field. The robots also can climb their alliance’s pyramid at the end of the match to score additional points. In the final thirty seconds the human players can throw their six colored discs into play over the alliance wall.

Scoring

Teams start with up to 2 or 3 discs on the robot at the beginning of the match. Robots which begin touching the carpet behind their colored Auto Line may have three discs; others may have only two. They can score these in autonomous or wait for the teleoperated period. Only the 6 discs of an alliance’s color count when scored on top of its pyramid. White or opposing colored discs will not count if scored in the pyramid. Since the human players may not put any colored discs in play until teleoperated, scoring in the pyramid is not possible in autonomous. Teams can score points as follows by scoring discs into goals:

Goal Autonomous Teleop
Low Goal 2 1
Middle Goal 4 2
High Goal 6 3
Pyramid Goal N/A 5
The match ends with robots attempting to climb pyramid game elements located on the field. Robots earn points by climbing the pyramid based on how high they climb. Levels are divided by the horizontal bars on the pyramid, with from the ground to the first bar being level 1. The following is the breakdown of the scoring:
Level Points
1 10
2 20
3 30

2012 Game: Rebound Rumble

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2012 Game: Rebound Rumble

Robot Name: Ollie-Oop

Match Periods

In Rebound Rumble, each match is 135 seconds long, and consists of 3 periods.

  • Hybrid – first 15 seconds. Code on the robots is remotely activated, and robots may react to sensor inputs and commands programmed into the robot’s onboard control system, or a member of the team can use the Kinect Sensor to send commands to a robot remotely. The robot attempts to score baskets to earn extra points.
  • Teleoperated – 105 seconds, starting after the Autonomous Period. Humans using a console drive their robots around the field, trying to score points by shooting game pieces into an of their team’s baskets.
  • End-game – final 15 seconds. At fifteen seconds to the end, teams try to navigate their robots onto their team’s colored bridge and score points by balancing 1, 2, or 3 robots on it. Alternatively, both alliances can try to balance two robots (one red and one blue) on the central ‘Coopertition’ bridge to earn Coopertition Points.

Field

The field is a carpeted area 27 feet by 54 feet designed to resemble a basketball court. Either side has a driver station and an array of basketball hoops. There is one low hoop, two middle hoops, and one high hoop. Across the narrow dimension of the field a 4 inch high wall, along which are placed three tilting bridges at a height of 12 inches. The bridges at the edges are color-coded for each alliance, and the center bridge, called the Coopertition bridge, is available for both alliances.

Scoring

The following is how many points baskets are worth during Hybrid and Teleop phases.

Hoop Hybrid Teleop
Bottom Row 4 Points 1 Points
Middle Row 5 Points 2 Points
Top Row 6 Points 3 Points

2011 Game: Logo Motion

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2011 Game: Logo Motion

Robot Name: Douggernaut

Match Periods

In Logo Motion, each match is 135 seconds long, and consists of 3 periods.

  • Autonomous – first 15 seconds. Code on the robots is remotely activated, and robots may react to sensor inputs and commands programmed into the robot’s onboard control system. The robot tries to score Ubertubes onto pegs on the scoring grid.
  • Teleoperated – 105 seconds, starting after the Autonomous Period. Humans using a console drive their robots around the field, trying to score points using any game piece except for Ubertubes.
  • Minibot/End-game – final 15 seconds. At fifteen seconds to the end, the tower bases flash their alliance color. Minibots may be deployed onto the towers in the final 10 seconds to score extra points. They may only be deployed during this period. The robots can still score the game tubes.

Field

The playing field for Logo Motion is 27-feet wide by 54-feet long, and is made of gray carpet. On each end of the field, there are scoring grids immediately in front of the alliance stations, where robots are remotely controlled by its drivers. Each alliance station is protected by a wall, known as the alliance wall. On each alliance wall, there are two scoring grids. Each scoring grid has 9 pegs arranged like a square. Each row is 37 inches above the next, except on the outside columns in each grid, where the bottom peg is only 30 inches above the ground. There are openings in the alliance wall, called feeding slots, in every corner, where an alliance member may enter playing pieces into play. However, to get from the scoring grid to your alliance’s feeding slot, you must transverse the field. Thus, many teams elect to throw tubes onto the field and have their alliance’s robots pick them from the ground. Four towers with cylindrical bases are in the middle of the field. The towers are used in the endgame for alliances to earn up to 30 or more points. To assist teams in driving and programming a robot through an almost completely open field, there is colored tape on the floor to allow for sensor calibration and to create visual reference points. Furthermore, the tape delineates areas where certain robots may or may not traverse.

Scoring

The following is how Ubertubes are scored as they are hung on the end field walls, during the autonomous period.

On bottom row 2 Points
On middle row 4 Points
On top row 6 Points

The following is how game pieces are scored as they are hung on the end field walls, during Teleoperated mode. Any tube that is part of a non-Ubertube triangle-circle-square group (depicting the FIRST logo) is worth double of the listed points.

NOT Hanging 0 Points 0 Points
Hanging on Bottom Row 1 Point 2 Points
Hanging on Middle Row 2 Points 4 Points
Hanging on Top Row 3 Points 6 Points

The following is how the mini-bot race is scored during the end game period. The end game is a race between four mini bots to reach the top of the tower poles on the field.

1st mini-bot to reach the top 30 Points
2nd mini-bot to reach the top 20 Points
3rd mini-bot to reach the top 15 Points
4th mini-bot to reach the top 10 Points

2010 Game: Breakaway

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2010 Game: Breakaway

Robot Name: Brand Kannon

Game Play

Robots play Breakaway on a 27 by 54-foot rectangular field known as the field. The field is bordered by a set of guardrails and alliance walls. There are two “bumps” in the field that divide it into three zones. During matches, the robots are controlled from alliance stations located outside the field at both ends. These rectangular zones consist of three-team player stations that provide connectivity between the controls used by the robot operators and the arena. Goals are located at the corners of the field, and extend behind the alliance wall and adjacent to the player stations. After goals are scored, human players must pick up the balls and pass them to the center of the alliance station to be placed on a ball return rack, after which they will re-enter play at midfield. Teams are penalized if balls are not re-entered within a set time limit.

Scoring

Balls are kicked or herded into goals located in the corners of the fields. There are two goals for each alliance, adding up to 4 goals total.

  • Scored Ball — 1 point

At the end of the match, bonus points are awarded for robots that cling onto either of the two towers in the center of the field. More bonus points are awarded if alliance robots can suspend themselves from the robot clinging onto the tower.

  • Suspended Bot — 2 points
  • Bot Suspended From Another Bot — 3 points

The following is how game pieces are scored as they are hung on the end field walls, during Teleoperated mode. Any tube that is part of a non-Ubertube triangle-circle-square group (depicting the FIRST logo) is worth double of the listed points.

Starting Positions

Each round lasts two minutes and fifteen seconds. In the first fifteen seconds of a round, the robots run in autonomous mode, then there are two minutes of game play during which robots are user-controlled. The game is played by two three-robot alliances with each team starting one robot in each of the three sections of the field. At the beginning of a match, every robot must be touching either one of the bisecting bumps or an alliance wall. Also, at the start of the match each of the 12 balls in play must be placed at one vertex of a six foot by six foot gird. There are two grids marked at either ends of each of the three zones.

2009 Game: Lunacy

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2009 Game: Lunacy

Robot Name: Mojo

Field

Lunacy is played on a rectangular field that is 54′ by 27′. This field is a material called ‘Glasliner FRP’ and is referred to as ‘Regolith’. The regolith is designed so that the robots, which have special mandated wheels that they cannot modify in any way, shape or form, have reduced traction, mimicking the effect of low gravity that would be seen by a robot driving on the moon.

Scoring

Moon Rocks (Orange and Purple) 120 available 2 pts each
Empty Cells (Orange and Blue) Up to 8 2 pts each
Super Cells (Green and Purple) Up to 8 15 pts each

Total score for the alliance is the total number of points scored by placing Moon Rocks, Empty Cells and Super Cells in the trailers of all of the robots of the opposing alliance, less any deductions for penalties.

Game Play

The goal of the game is to score as many of the game pieces in the opposing side’s trailers as possible. Robots start out in front of the opposite alliances’ human players. There is a 15 second autonomous period, during which robots operate according to programs that teams download to their robot, and a 2 minute Teleoperated period, where robots are driven and controlled by a human drive subteam at one end of the field. Empty cells (also worth 2 points) must be handed to a robot by the “payload specialist” at the mid-field position known as the “outpost”. The robot must deliver the Empty Cell to their human player on one of the corners in order to get a Super Cell that is worth 15 points. A robot can only carry one Empty Cell at a time. Super Cells can only be put into play during the last 20 seconds of play, and only if the human player has been delivered an Empty Cell.

2008 Game: FIRST Overdrive

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2008 Game: FIRST Overdrive

Robot Name: Sharky’s Machine

Game Play

FIRST Overdrive is played on a 54 ft (16 m) by 27 ft (8 m) carpeted field, divided lengthwise by a fence median to create a track, and separate the field into Red and Blue zones. The fence is crossed by an overpass marking the red and blue finish lines, and hold the game pieces: 40 in (1,016 mm) diameter inflated balls called “Trackballs”. Two three-team alliances race around the track in a counter clockwise direction while manipulating the trackballs to score points.

The game is made up of two scoring periods. The first 15 seconds of play is the Hybrid period in which robots are autonomous, and may also respond to certain digital signals sent by team members designated as “Robocoaches”, who are stationed at the corners of the track.

The next two minutes of play is the Teleoperated period. At this time, robots are fully radio controlled by the team operators standing at either end of the field.

Scoring

During the Hybrid period, robots traversing the field in a counter-clockwise direction score:

  • 8 points for each of their Trackballs knocked off of the overpass
  • 8 points for each of their Trackballs passed over the overpass
  • 4 points whenever their robot crosses a lane marker
  • 4 points whenever their robot crosses their opponent’s finish line
  • 4 points whenever their robot crosses their finish line
  • 2 points whenever their trackball crosses their finish line

The Hybrid Period

Hybrid period is a new addition to an FRC game. Rather than the pre-game autonomous modes of previous years where robots were prohibited from receiving input from humans, robots may receive signals via an infrared (IR) remote control or visible light from a designated Robocoach during the Hybrid period. The number of different IR signals the IR board included in the kit of parts is physically able to receive is 4. The number of distinct commands that are allowed to be sent is also 4, thus ruling out multi-signal combinations.