2023 Game: Charged Up

Lakota Robotics | Current Game, Game Announcements

2023 Game: Charged Up

Check out this game reveal video!

Robot Name: TBD

Field and Scoring

Charged Up is played on a 27 feet (8.2 m) by 54 feet (16 m) field covered in grey carpet. The field is surrounded by low polycarbonate walls on the long sides and taller alliance station walls on the short sides. The human player stations on the long sides also feature a taller wall made of wire mesh panels.

The field is divided in half by a white line, and each half includes one alliance’s Community and the other alliance’s Loading Zone. The primary scoring areas are the two Communities (one per alliance), which are located near the two alliance station walls. Robots begin the match fully contained within their alliance’s Community. Each Community includes a Grid where game pieces can be scored and a Charging Station that robots can drive onto and balance on during the autonomous period and at the end of the match.

2022 Game: Rapid React

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2022 Game: Rapid React

Check out this game reveal video!

Robot Name: Bobarazzi

Field and Scoring

Rapid React is played on a 27 ft. (~823 cm) by 54 ft. (~1646 cm) field covered in grey carpet. The field is surrounded by low polycarbonate walls on the long sides and higher polycarbonate driver station walls on the short sides. The field is divided in half by a white line. The primary scoring area, called the Hub, is surrounded by four taped-off areas known as Tarmacs (two red and two blue) where robots start the match. At the end of the match, robots can climb monkey bars in areas called the Hangars.

Alliance Station

Each alliance has their own alliance station on their end of the field, divided into three smaller stations (one for each team). The alliance stations are flanked by the alliance’s Hangar on one side and a Terminal on the other side.

Terminals

Alliances can use the Terminals to introduce Cargo into the field and return Cargo to their human players. Either alliance can use either Terminal, as opposed to player stations in previous games which were restricted to one alliance. Due to this, human players in the terminals must wear alliance-colored aprons to identify themselves.

Cargo

Cargo is the only game element in Rapid React. Each Cargo is an oversized inflatable tennis ball with a diameter of 9.5 in. (~24 cm). There are 22 Cargo on the field, 11 per alliance.

Scoring Areas

Hub

There is one Hub in the center of the field, and both alliances can score in it. There are two levels, a lower hub 3 ft 5 in (~104 cm) above the field and an upper hub 8 ft. 8 in. (~264 cm) above the field. Robots earn more points by shooting into the upper hub compared to shooting into the lower hub. The upper hub is smaller than the lower hub, which combined with its height makes it harder to score into.

Scoring in the lower hub is worth two points in autonomous mode and one point in teleoperated mode, while scoring in the upper hub is worth four points and two points respectively. Alliances can earn a ranking point by scoring 20 Cargo in the Hub, or 18 Cargo if the alliance scored 5 Cargo in autonomous mode. This is known as the Cargo Bonus.

Hangars

Hangars are large trusses with four legs, similar to the Shield Generator in Infinite Recharge. There are two Hangars, one for each alliance. At the end of the match, robots can climb onto the monkey bars in their alliance’s Hangar to earn climb points. There are four levels, with the lowest bar positioned 4 ft. 3/4 in. (~124 cm) above the field and the highest bar positioned 7 ft. 7 in. (~231 cm) above the field. Robots may not extend to be taller than 5 ft. 6 in. (~168cm) at any point in the match, so reaching higher monkey bars requires a robot to swinging onto one from a lower monkey bar.

Teams earn more points for climbing to higher levels of the monkey bars. The lowest level is worth 4 points, with the other three levels worth 6 points, 10 points, and 15 points respectively. Alliances can earn the Hangar Bonus by scoring at least 16 climb points.

Launch Pads

Each alliance’s Hangar also provides two safe zones called the Launch Pads, which allow that alliance’s robots to shoot Cargo into the Hub without being contacted by opponent robots. The Launch Pads are identified by strips of alliance-colored plastic on the bottom of the two Hub-facing legs of each Hangar, and a team can enter the safe zone by touching one of their alliance’s Launch Pads with their robot’s bumper. A team is assessed a foul if their robot contacts an opponent robot that is touching one of the opponent’s Launch Pads.

Scoring Summary

ActionAutonomousTeleoperatedRanking Points(in Qualification)
Robot Exits Tarmac2 points
Cargo in Lower Hub2 points1 point
Cargo in Upper Hub4 points2 points
Hangar Climb (Level One)4 points
Hangar Climb (Level Two)6 points
Hangar Climb (Level Three)10 Points
Hangar Climb (Level Four)15 Points
Cargo Bonus1 RP
Hangar Bonus1 RP
Foul4 points to opposing alliance4 points to opposing alliance
Tech Foul8 points to opposing alliance8 points to opposing alliance
Win2 RP
Tie1 RP

In qualification rounds, teams are ranked by their Ranking Score, or their average number of Ranking Points (RP) per match. To ensure high placement, it is not only important to win matches, but to complete the secondary objectives as well, to amass as many Ranking Points as possible.

2021 Game: Infinite Recharge at Home

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2021 Game: Infinite Recharge at Home

See also: 2020 Game: Infinite Recharge

Check out this game reveal video!

Robot Name: Bampás

2020 Robot - Bampas

About the robot name

Paul George working as an FTA at a FIRST Competiton

In loving memory of Paul George: a passionate mentor and caring friend.
(June 29, 1954 – January 15, 2020, age 65)

At the beginning of this season, our mentor Paul George passed away after a long battle with cancer, surrounded by family and friends.

Paul was affectionately referred to by the team as “Dad” and was very proud of his greek heritage. In his honor, we have name this year’s robot “Bampás” or μπαμπας which means “Dad” in greek.

You can read more about Paul in this article published by FIRST.

A letter from FIRST about the 2021 season

Dear FIRST® Community,

We have been evaluating different scenarios for all our programs over the past many months and have already implemented several changes to provide every student participant a valuable, enjoyable experience, regardless of learning environment this season. With the launch of the FIRST® LEGO® League and FIRST® Tech Challenge programs, we’ve introduced Remote Events for regions unable to hold in-person competitions.  Also, we recently announced an extension to our season to provide additional time and flexibility to start build seasons and prepare for local and remote events. 

With the opening of FIRST® Robotics Competition team registration the week of October 5, we would like to share what we have in store for the 2021 season. Recognizing ongoing challenges for teams with remote and hybrid learning, limited access to build spaces, tools, and robots, as well as uncertainty for traveling to and attending in-person events, we are excited to introduce these new opportunities for FIRST Robotics Competition teams to participate this season:

  • The Game Design Challenge will allow registered teams to design their own FIRST Robotics Competition game using real-world, virtual, or hybrid design elements, and compete for judged awards. Winning concepts will be considered for use in future official games. 
     
  • In the Innovation Challenge presented by Qualcomm, registered teams will identify a real-world problem related to this season’s theme, FIRST® GAME CHANGERSSM powered by Star Wars: Force for Change, design a solution, build a business model, and deliver a pitch to compete with other FIRST Robotics Competition teams for judged awards. This new challenge will have an advancement track, culminating in the Global Innovation Awards, a multi-day experience where students showcase their innovations, participate in workshops and receive mentorship from experts, and compete for awards.
     
  • INFINITE RECHARGESM at Home brings components of events to you in two ways:
    • Teams show off what their robots and drivers can do in a skills challenge based on the 2020 INFINITE RECHARGE game. Scores are posted, and teams virtually compete against each other for the Skills Challenge Awards
    • Teams illustrate their robot’s technical qualities by sharing information with judges remotely in competition for traditional robot-based awards. Teams can participate with or without access to their robot. 
       
  • In addition, our entire community, regardless of team registration or payment status, will continue to have opportunities to participate in online activities through FIRST @ Home throughout the entire season.

All aspects of the Kit of Parts will be available, including the Kickoff Kit, the Virtual Kit and FIRST Choice. New rookie teams will receive Kickoff Kit items comparable to those shipped in the 2020 rookie Kickoff Kits.  The Veteran Kickoff Kits will be limited in breadth and quantity of items while still helping support teams this season.

In addition, teams will have the ability to compete for traditional submitted awards including Chairman’s Award, FIRST Dean’s List Award, and the Woodie Flowers Finalists Awards and access to more than 3,000 scholarship opportunities from over 200 FIRST Scholarship Providers with additional opportunities for career discovery throughout the season. 

For in-person INFINITE RECHARGE game play, we’ve been exploring ways to comply with anticipated social distancing requirements, which would likely include single-day events, reducing the number of teams and team members attending, making judging entirely remote, eliminating spectators, and extending our season.  Unfortunately, we recognize that even with these adjustments there are many areas where it will likely be difficult, if not impossible, to hold these in-person events unless there is major and unexpected change with the pandemic.

As a result, we’ve made the difficult decision that we will open the FIRST Robotics Competition registration built around a season experience that does not include in-person game play.  This means that we will not be including initial game play events with team registration, nor will we publish a season game play schedule.  Teams won’t be participating in the usual event preferencing, nor will they sign up for any game play at this time.  We made this decision partially in an effort to be fully transparent with FIRST Robotics Competition teams, so they know what to expect when they register.

If conditions change, we will evaluate the possibility of adding in-person game play events later this season.  We have targeted January for the first re-evaluation. If in-person game play is determined to be possible, that option would be made available to registered teams for an additional event fee later in the season. But as of now, teams should not expect that the FIRST Robotics Competition season will include official in-person game play. 

In light of not rolling out a new FIRST Robotics Competition game this year and the likelihood that in-person game play cannot happen (and if it does, most team members will not be there in-person), the 2021 registration fee will be reduced to $2,000 for veteran teams and $3,000 for rookie teams who will also receive the full rookie kit-of-parts.

While this season will look different and present many changes for our entire community, we are confident the new team-based opportunities mentioned above will allow our participants to have a fulfilling season, as we continue to execute the mission of FIRST and inspire the next generation of our future science and technology leaders – the same mission that has guided us for more than 30 years.

Here’s a message from FIRST founder Dean Kamen:
 

 “The world needs FIRST more than ever because the world needs you – our best leaders and innovators of science and technology. I’ve said since the beginning that FIRST isn’t about the robots. It’s not about the competitions. It’s about the community and the inspiration that comes from collaboration, creative problem solving, and innovation. That’s why I am thrilled about the opportunities FIRST has to offer for FIRST Robotics Competition and all our programs this season. These fun and rigorous new challenges will inspire our participants in new ways, and allow each of you to have a true impact on FIRST and your communities. I hope you’ll join us for this exciting season, and I look forward to seeing everyone back on the field when the time is right.”


As Dean says, FIRST is more than robots, and FIRST Robotics Competition is more than in person game play – it is about mentorship, teamwork, learning new skills, being part of a community, and creating innovative solutions to problems never seen before. 

We hope that you will join us as we head into a new and exciting season with your safety and wellbeing as our top priority.

Your friends at FIRST HQ

2020 Game: Infinite Recharge

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2020 Game: Infinite Recharge

Check out this game reveal video!

Robot Name: Bampás

2020 Robot - Bampas

About the robot name

Paul George working as an FTA at a FIRST Competiton

In loving memory of Paul George: a passionate mentor and caring friend.
(June 29, 1954 – January 15, 2020, age 65)

At the beginning of this season, our mentor Paul George passed away after a long battle with cancer, surrounded by family and friends.

Paul was affectionately referred to by the team as “Dad” and was very proud of his greek heritage. In his honor, we have name this year’s robot “Bampás” or μπαμπας which means “Dad” in greek.

You can read more about Paul in this article published by FIRST.

Field

Infinite Recharge is played on a 26 ft 11 1/4 in (~821 cm) by 52 ft 5 1/4 in(~1598 cm) field covered in grey low-pile carpet. The field is bounded by short transparent polycarbonate guardrails on the longer sides and the taller Alliance Station walls on the shorter side. The field features two sectors, with each containing one end for each alliance combined with the rendezvous point (center area). The sector contains robots at the start of each match, while drivers control their robots at the alliance station. The rendezvous point contains the Shield Generator and the Trenches.

Alliance Station

Each team has their own Alliance Station that is positioned at one of the ends of the field. The Alliance Station is where drivers control their robots, human players deliver game pieces to robots, and opposing alliance robots shoot game pieces. Alliance Stations contain three driver’s stations, one for each participating team in the alliance. The center player station is flanked on one side by the loading bay, and on the other side by the opposing alliance’s power port.

Loading Bay

Loading Bays are located in the alliance stations, with one per alliance. The Loading Bays are used by the human player to give game pieces to the robots on the field. There are five places that game pieces can be put into the Loading Bay, with two upper ports, and three ground ports.

Power Cell

Power Cells are the main game piece in Infinite Recharge. The Power Cell is a yellow, 7 in (~18cm) diameter Medium Bounce Dino-Skin foam ball. The FIRST logo is printed in black ink on each Power Cell.

Shield Generator

The Shield Generator is a large box-shaped structure located in the center of the field. It contains both alliances Rendezvous Points, as well as the two Generator Switches.

Trench Run

The Trench Run is an approximately 4 ft by 18 ft rectangular area on each side of the field bounded by alliance-colored tape that contains the alliance’s Control Panel. It is located in the middle of the field, directly adjacent to the Shield Generator.

Scoring Areas

Power Port

There are two Power Ports on the field, with one at each Alliance Station. An alliance’s Power Port is located at the opposing alliance’s Alliance Station, requiring robots that intake from the Loading Bays to drive across the field in order to score Power Cells. There are three levels of scoring on a Power Port. The rectangular Bottom Port is worth two points in autonomous, or one in the teleoperated (or teleop) period. The hexagonal Outer Port is located above the Bottom Port, and is worth four points during the autonomous period, and two points in teleop. The Inner Port is located inside of the Outer Port, and is a much smaller circular hole set in the back of the Outer Port. It is worth six points in autonomous, and three during teleop.

Scoring Power Cells into the Power Port contributes towards reaching Capacity. Upon scoring a Power Cell into any port, one point is credited towards reaching Capacity, regardless of where it is scored. Certain levels of Capacity require additional tasks to be completed. Lights around the Power Cell indicate progression towards reaching a stage’s Capacity, lighting up in a chase pattern when Capacity is reached but the extra condition is yet to be fulfilled. Upon reaching Capacity and completing the stage’s additional task, the stage is said to be Activated.

StagePower Cell CapacityAdditional ConditionsActivating Grants
19The teleoperated phasemust have begun.Unlocks Rotation Control.
220Rotation Control must be complete.Unlocks Position Control.
320Position Control must be complete.One Ranking Point.

Control Panel

There are two Control Panels placed on either side of the middle of the field, in each alliance’s Trench. They are large discs, with eight colored wedges (red, yellow, blue, and green, repeated once) printed on both the top and bottom. There is a glass panel on the bottom of the Control Panel, however, its wedges are still visible from underneath. After activating Stage 1 and reaching Stage 2’s capacity, an alliance may may score 10 points by performing Rotation Control on the Control Panel. This entails spinning the Control Panel at least 3 times, but not more than 5. Rotating past a fifth rotation resets this task, and the rotations must be completed again. After activating Stage 2 and reaching Stage 3’s capacity, the alliance may score 20 points by performing Position Control. This entails rotating the Control Panel to a certain color specified by the Field Management System through a message sent to each team’s driver’s station. When complete, this energizes the Shield Generator, gaining the alliance one ranking point.

Rendezvous Point

An alliance’s Rendezvous Point is located underneath the Shield generator, and is marked with each alliance’s color on three sides, with the fourth side being a black line separating the two Rendezvous Points. Alliances gain 5 points for each robot parked there when the game ends or 25 for each robot hanging, which will be explained below.

Generator Switch

A Generator Switch is located above each alliance’s Rendezvous Point, and is attached to the Shield Generator. During the final 30 seconds of a match, robots may extend up and attach to the bar on the bottom of the switch. Each robot attached to the switch and off the ground at the end of the match is worth 25 extra points. The switch is able to swing back and forth when robots attach to it, and there is an additional 15 point bonus for balancing the switch within ~8 degrees of level. An additional ranking point will also be given to an alliance if their endgame score (ie., that of climbing and parking) exceeds 65 points, which makes the Shield Generator operational.

Scoring Summary

ActionAutonomousTeleopRanking Points(in Qualification)
Initiation Line Cross5 points  
Power Cells in Bottom Port2 points1 point 
Power Cells in Outer Port4 points2 point 
Power Cells in Inner Port6 points3 point 
Control Panel Rotation Control 10 points 
Control Panel Position Control 20 points 
Hang on Shield Generator 25 Points 
Park below Shield Generator 5 Points 
Generator Switch Level 15 Points 
Shield Generator Operational  1 RP
Shield Generator Energized  1 RP
Foul3 points to opposing alliance3 points to opposing alliance 
Tech Foul15 points to opposing alliance15 points to opposing alliance 
Win  2 RP
Tie  1 RP

In qualification rounds, teams are ranked by their Ranking Score, or their average number of Ranking Points (RP) per match. To ensure high placement, it is not only important to win matches, but to complete the secondary objectives as well, to amass as many Ranking Points as possible.

2019 Game: Destination Deep Space

Lakota Robotics | Game Announcements

2019 Game: Destination Deep Space

Check out this game reveal video!

Robot Name: Oggsmonaut

Field

Destination: Deep Space is played on a 27 ft (823 cm) by 54 ft (1646 cm) field that is covered in grey carpet. The field is bounded by transparent polycarbonate guardrails on the longer sides and the Alliance Station walls on the shorter side. The field features two types of zones, one for each alliance. The habitat zone contains robots at the start and end of each match, while the alliance station is where drivers control their robots. For the first time, a Google Cardboard headset was included in the kickoff kit to allow teams to view a virtual field.

Alliance Station

Each alliance has their own Alliance Station that is positioned at one of the ends of the field. The Alliance Station is where drivers control their robots, human players deliver game pieces to robots, and coaches give advice to their team members. Each alliance station features two game piece holding areas on the sides of the driver stations.

Depots

Depots are placed on the field next to the alliance stations, with two per alliance. Before the match starts, alliances are permitted to stage cargo in their respective depots for robots to retrieve during the match.

Sandstorm

The sandstorm is installed above each alliance’s alliance station, and is used to obscure the drive team’s vision during the sandstorm period. Once that period ends, the sandstorm retracts in order to allow drivers to see the field for the remainder of the match.

Loading Stations

Each alliance station features two loading stations near the edges of the alliance station. Human players use the loading stations to deliver hatch covers and cargo to robots through a chute, where they can be collected by a waiting robot.

Scoring Areas

Rockets

There are four rockets on the field, two per alliance. Each rocket features three levels, made up of two bays, where game pieces can be scored. Two hatch covers and two pieces of cargo can be scored on each level.

Cargo Ships

There are two cargo ships placed in the middle of the field, one per alliance. As with the rockets, each cargo ship features bays where hatch covers and cargo can be scored. Each cargo ship has eight bays, each capable of holding one hatch cover and one cargo.

Habitat Platforms

Each alliance controls one habitat platform near the alliance station wall. Robots start the match at their alliance’s respective habitat platform, and must return to the same platform at the end of the match. Each habitat platform has three levels, and parking on a higher level at the end of the match earns the alliance more points.

Gameplay and Scoring

Scoring Elements

There are two scoring elements in Destination: Deep Space; hatch covers and cargo. Hatch covers are 19 in. (~48 cm) diameter polycarbonate toroids, and cargo is represented by orange 13 in. (~33 cm) playground balls.

Sandstorm Period

For the 2019 season, the sandstorm period replaced the autonomous period, which had been used in many previous FRC games. Robots start the match at their respective habitat platforms, fully supported by habitat platform level one or two. The first 15 seconds of the match is the sandstorm period, where robots act solely on pre-programmed instructions, therefore acting autonomously, or under control of their drivers with the aid of a vision system mounted on the robot. Robots can earn points in a variety of ways. For each robot that fully crosses the habitat line during the sandstorm period, the alliance earns three points if the robot started on habitat platform level one and six points if the robot started on level two. Robots are also able to earn points for scoring hatch panels and cargo on their alliance’s rockets and cargo ship. As these actions carry the same point value as if they occurred in the teleop period, they will be further discussed in that section.

Teleop Period

After the sandstorm period ends, the teleop (tele-operated) period begins, which lasts for 135 seconds. Drivers control their robot from their Driver Station and human players continue to deliver game pieces to the robots. During this period, as in autonomous, every hatch panel scored on a rocket or cargo ship will earn three points for the alliance. Additionally, scoring cargo into a rocket or cargo ship will earn three points for the alliance.

End Game

The last 30 seconds of the teleop period is called the end game. During this time, robots can earn additional points by climbing back onto their alliance’s habitat platform. A robot ending the match on level one will earn the alliance 3 points, while ending the match on level two will earn 6 points and ending the match on level three will earn 12 points.

Special Scoring

In addition to earning match points, an alliance can earn a ranking point during the qualification rounds by accumulating a total of 15 end game points at the end of the match, which is known as habitat docking. An alliance can also earn a ranking point by completing a rocket, which entails scoring two hatch covers and two pieces of cargo on each level. A foul will result in 3 points being credited to the opposing alliance, and a tech foul will result in 10 points being credited to the opposing alliance.

Scoring Summary

Action Sandstorm Teleop Ranking Points
Sandstorm Bonus (Level One) 3 points
Sandstorm Bonus (Level Two) 6 points
Hatch Panel 2 points 2 points
Cargo 3 points 3 points
Habitat Climb Bonus (Level One) 3 points
Habitat Climb Bonus (Level Two) 6 points
Habitat Climb Bonus (Level Three) 12 points
Habitat Docking 1 RP (in Qualification)
One Complete Rocket 1 RP (in Qualification)
Foul 3 points 3 points
Tech Foul 10 points 10 points
Win 2 RP (in Qualification)
Tie 1 RP (in Qualification)